Dildology.org: Finally.

Finally. We finally have a neutral, non-governmental, third party non-profit organization that tests sex toy materials. 

Why is this necessary? Firstly, you know how I feel about materials: I’m strictly against porous materials like jelly rubber, elastomer, and others because they harbor dirt and bacteria. Pthalates are used in porous plastics to soften the material and can be harmful: they’ve been banned in children’s toys and there’s some research that links them to cancer and reproductive health problems, though there is not much research that has been done on the full effect of the substance. Not to mention that they stink to high hell and leach out of the low grade materials, leaving a greasy sheen that gets all over your hands and if you’re like me, you react to it. My hands: which are nowhere near as sensitive as the thin mucous membranes in the vagina and anus, not to mention the mouth. 
The sex toy industry is unregulated, so companies can say whatever they’d like on their packaging.  They can say 100% Silicone, Pthalate Free, Medical Grade: and none of that has to be true. However, this doesn’t mean that the government needs to regulate the industry. As Dangerous Lilly, one of the people behind Dildology.org stated on her blog post about the launch of the non-profit: 

“We can cry out for the industry to be regulated by our government, but really what will that get us? A higher priced dildo. A “luxury sex toy” that costs double what they do now, and their current costs are already prohibitive to many. Sex toys that take twice as long in development resulting in fewer, quality new sex toys being introduced to the market every year. When you bring the FDA to the party, you get mountains of paperwork, costly fees and annual 3-4 week-long audits to retain your FDA classifications. The better solution just might be to let the industry self-regulate, but with a little help from a neutral party.”

The best thing in my mind that can be done is raise awareness: give the consumer the knowledge they need to know what materials are safe and which aren’t, and why. The consumer changes the industry more than anything else. If people won’t buy porous or harmful products, companies stop making them because they can’t make money off of them, simple as that. I’ve been working towards this goal as best I can on this blog but a non-profit can do a lot more than I can. Dildology.org will not only be testing products but educating people- bringing industry knowledge to the public. This is, as I view it, an incredibly necessary service to the industry and comes just as people are becoming more conscious about sex toy materials in relation to their bodies. 

How can you help? spread the word. donate so dildology.org can pay for the (very pricey) testing of materials. support their cause with kind words and the many thanks they deserve.

Get in touch with Dildology.org and the people behind it:

Dildology.org: Facebook | Twitter
Crista Anne: Blog | Twitter | Facebook | Tumblr
Dangerous Lilly: Blog | Twitter | Facebook | LinkedIn
X. Valentine Orenda: Blog | Twitter | Tumblr

Read Dangerous Lilly’s Press Release about the Launch of Dildology.org:

Dildology.org: The Science of Sex Toys

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